Reblog: The Problem With Patient Experience

This is one of (if not) the best article I’ve read on the key drivers of patient experience! Clear and simple!

Experience Innovation Network

This blog post originally appeared on the PRC Custom Research blog on April 30, 2015. Co-authored by William Maples, M.D., oncologist, passionate and compassionate champion for experience improvement, founding member and continuing contributor to the Experience Innovation Network, we thought it was too good not to share. Reblogged with permission.

By William Maples, MD, Executive Director for The Institute for Healthcare Excellence and Candace A. Quinn, COO, Professional Research Consultants, Inc.

As a result of an article that we saw recently in The Atlantic that attempted to describe the quest for creating an excellent patient experience as one that has nurses and caregivers pursuing some holy grail of happiness, good food, and smiles, we reflected on the importance and impact of patient experience on the overall care and eventual health of each and every patient, and, we have reaffirmed our conviction that our industry must first develop an understanding of…

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At your service: Bringing hospitality to hospitals leads to happier patients

BringMeTheNews.com

While you won’t get a mint on your pillow at your next hospital stay, you may notice a better overall experience. Hospitals are taking a cue from the hospitality industry to boost patient satisfaction with a newly created job: chief experience officer.

Think of a chief experience officer (CXO) as a high-level hospital concierge who ensures that a patient’s hospital stay is as comfortable and pleasant as possible. A CXO champions compassionate care, focusing on open communication with patients and “making sure staff are attentive to their needs, whether that’s more face time with nurses or quieter hallways so they can sleep,” reports The Washington Post.

Happy patients, prosperous hospitals

The shift to improve customer service isn’t entirely due to the kindness of medical executives; it benefits hospitals as well. Patient satisfaction scores — tallied by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey — have…

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Lesson From Dana-Farber: Treat The Whole Person

Customer Experience Matters®

As part of yesterday’s Customer Experience Day celebration, I attended a CXPA local networking event at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) in Boston. The session kicked off with a panel from the DFCI discussing patient experience.

I’m a big fan of DFCI and have enormous respect for the great work that it does in battling cancer. The panel, which included a cancer survivor turned volunteer, was fantastic. I was inspired by the commitment and compassion they displayed.

One of the points that came up was DFCI’s commitment to treat the whole person. This explains why it provides things such as hand massages during chemotherapy treatment. DFCI doesn’t just treat the disease, it treats the whole person.

I love the concept of the whole person. It’s not just applicable to DFCI or other health care providers, but to every organization. It’s a powerful concept for anyone who cares about customer experience. Here’s how I…

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“She gained as much as she gave.” TMC Volunteer contributes to major improvements for diabetics’ care

Tucson Medical Center

Marjorie Zismann TMC Volunteer Marjorie Zismann
TMC Volunteer

“You have diabetes.  Buy a book.”

That’s what Marjorie Zismann’s doctor told her when he diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes in her early 60’s.  Since then, attempts to understand her disease have left her completely frustrated. Every day, she weighs herself, pricks her finger, squeezes out a drop of blood to check her blood sugar and takes her medication. Mealtimes consist of sorting out “yes” foods from “no” foods, which leaves her feeling restricted with little control over her disease.

Now 78 years old and retired, Zismann volunteers at Tucson Medical Center. She was a patient here about a year ago, and was invited to be a patient advocate during what’s called a “kaizen.”  It’s a rapid-improvement workshop made up of about a dozen leaders from different departments who set out to tackle a very specific issue. The meeting is a crucial process of TMC’s…

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The Value of Customer Experience, Quantified


Plan of Care Whiteboards Post 2: Improving Satisfaction and Length of Stay at Riley Hospital for Children

Experience Innovation Network

Nurses in the PICU at Riley Hospital for Children are dedicated to their work.  They take care of some of the sickest kids, and try to provide comfort and support to parents and families as well.  But despite their best efforts, survey scores for parents’ trust in ICU nurses, feeling nurses explained clearly, and believing they had enough input into their child’s care were only in the mid-seventies (for percent always).

Knowing how important communication and trust are to parents of PICU patients, three experienced PICU nurses applied for and received a grant from the AACN and devised a solution to improve plan of care communication.  They combed evidence-based best practices, conducted an appreciative inquiry with a high-performing unit within their hospital, spoke with fellow care team members, and tapped into the expertise of their Parents as Faculty program to get a clear patient/family perspective.  The solution they created built…

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Reprise: Is Anyone Listening? A quick service tale

Blanchard LeaderChat

bigstock-Close-up-of-female-doctor-usin-46247311Walking out to the supermarket with a bag in each hand, I felt “pain” as I took a step. It was like a snap in my foot and PAIN, like a pinch – ouch! I got to the car and drove home.  My foot was swollen and it hurt–especially if I put any weight on it. As soon as I put the groceries away, I called and got an appointment with the Physician’s Assistant at my doctor’s office.

(A little bit about my doctor – looking at the photo collages on her office walls, you could have cut her face out and put mine in. We had lived such similar lives – I could have matched her photo for photo.  We were close in age, both first born, and I felt very connected with her. She was a good listener – I thought…)

Back to the pain in my foot…

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