Managers’ spirituality, mindfulness, and ethical behaviour

Originally posted on Benefits of mindfulness and meditation:

McGhee, P., & Grant, P. (2015). The influence of managers’ spiritual mindfulness on ethical behaviour in organisations. Journal of Spirituality, Leadership and Management, 8 (1), 12-33.Full text.

Abstract. Recently, there have been several corporate scandals both in New Zealand and overseas involving unethical management behaviour that caused significant harm to a range of stakeholders. The literature on spirituality and mindfulness posits that each could enhance ethical praxis and management conduct if they were encouraged in organisations. To date, minimal work has been completed bringing these related constructs together and demonstrating how and why they might influence ethical decision-making and behaviour positively. This paper attempts such a combination.

As part of a larger study, 14 managers from a variety of organisations were interviewed to determine how their spirituality influenced their ethical behaviour in the workplace. Using stories of real-life critical incidents and thematic analysis, this research found that…

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Answering the Fundamental Question of Mindful Self-Compassion

Originally posted on UCSD Center for Mindfulness:

by By Steven Hickman, Psy.D.
Mindful Self-Compassion Teacher and Teacher Trainer
Executive Director, UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness

steve-hickmanTo locate an 8-week Mindful Self-Compassion course near you, or to locate a 5-day intensive MSC program, see the Center for Mindful Self-Compassion website. Dr. Hickman will be co-leading upcoming MSC intensives in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada in late August and near Rome, Italy in early October. For mindfulness and self-compassion courses in San Diego, see the UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness website.

It’s a simple question, really. But one that often brings on a state of perplexed astonishment when someone asks us.

“What do you need?”

Unless we are a sobbing child who has come rushing to his mother after some sort of sibling transgression, or we are urgently and frantically searching for the restroom in an unfamiliar restaurant, we have an unusually hard time answering that question.

In a…

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Creating a culture of mindfulness in medicine

Originally posted on Benefits of mindfulness and meditation:

Luchterhand, C., et al. (2015). Creating a Culture of Mindfulness in Medicine. Health Innovations (Wisconsin Medical Journal), 114(3), 105-109. Full text.

Background: Well-documented challenges faced by primary care clinicians have brought growing awareness to the issues of physician wellness and burnout and the potential subsequent impact on patients. Research has identified mindfulness as a tool to increase clinician well-being and enhance clinician characteristics associated with a more patient-centered orientation to clinical care.

Objective: The overall goal of our intervention was to promote the cultivation of mindful awareness throughout our health system, creating a culture of mindfulness in medicine
Methods: We developed a systems-level strategy to promote health and resilience for clinicians and patients by preparing a group of clinician leaders to serve as catalysts to practice and teach mindfulness. The strategy involved 3 steps: (1) select 5 primary care leaders to help foster mindfulness within both…

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Reblog: The Problem With Patient Experience

Doug Della Pietra:

This is one of (if not) the best article I’ve read on the key drivers of patient experience! Clear and simple!

Originally posted on Experience Innovation Network:

This blog post originally appeared on the PRC Custom Research blog on April 30, 2015. Co-authored by William Maples, M.D., oncologist, passionate and compassionate champion for experience improvement, founding member and continuing contributor to the Experience Innovation Network, we thought it was too good not to share. Reblogged with permission.

By William Maples, MD, Executive Director for The Institute for Healthcare Excellence and Candace A. Quinn, COO, Professional Research Consultants, Inc.

As a result of an article that we saw recently in The Atlantic that attempted to describe the quest for creating an excellent patient experience as one that has nurses and caregivers pursuing some holy grail of happiness, good food, and smiles, we reflected on the importance and impact of patient experience on the overall care and eventual health of each and every patient, and, we have reaffirmed our conviction that our industry must first develop an understanding of…

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6 Steps to Rebuild Broken Trust

Originally posted on Blanchard LeaderChat:

Trust Under ConstructionI believe most leaders strive to be trustworthy. There aren’t too many leaders who wake up in the morning, roll out of bed and say to themselves, “Hmmm…I think I’ll try to break someone’s trust today!” Yet even in spite of our best intentions, there will be times when we damage the level of trust in our relationships. Sometimes it’s due to our own stupidity when we make choices that we know are wrong or hurtful to others. Other times we unknowingly erode trust by engaging in behaviors that others interpret as untrustworthy. Regardless of how it happens, breaking trust in a relationship is a serious matter. When a breach of trust occurs, there are six steps a leader should take to repair the relationship:

  1. Acknowledge that trust has been broken. As we’ve learned from the success of the twelve-step recovery process, acknowledging that there is a problem is the first…

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Engaging Patients in Hourly Rounding: Improving the Patient and the Caregiver Experience

Originally posted on Engaging The Patient:

Contributors: Geri Lynn Baumblatt – Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi Solutions; Greg Berney – Senior Manager of Patient Experience, Cone Health (Originally published for the Association of Patient Experience)

Greg Berney Greg Berney

Several months ago, a Patient Experience Manager at Cone Health was rounding with a nurse on a med/surg department. We’ll call him “James.” As James discussed different patient experience improvement tactics, he verbalized a concern with hourly rounding logs. “Each time I put my initials on that log I feel frustration with leadership because it feels like they don’t trust me.” Leaders, in turn, felt frustrated because the logs were their only way of ensuring hourly rounding was happening.

While James identified a lack of trust as his main frustration, this also articulates a greater challenge in improving the Patient Experience: ensuring our goals and how we motivate caregivers to meet those goals match. As James would tell you…

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What Behavioral Economics Can Teach Us About the Patient Experience

Originally posted on Engaging The Patient:

Contributor: Courtney Hummel – Senior Client Services Specialist, Emmi Solutions

Courtney Hummel Courtney Hummel

In his TEDtalk, “The Riddle of Experience vs. Memory”, behavioral economist Daniel Kahneman tells a short story about a man listening to a symphony. The man experiences such joy throughout the entire performance , intensely feeling and relating to the music. As the recording meandered to its finale, the music suddenly stopped, replaced by a horrible screeching sound. This ruined the entire symphony, the man solemnly remembered. But, had it? He experienced 20 minutes of glorious music, jarred by a few seconds of madness. But those 20 minutes were now irrelevant; the experience was ruined, replaced with a marred memory.

One key takeaway from this scenario is the human memory is significantly and consistently biased. We must understand that a memory is merely the end result of an experience and the processing of that experience. It’s helpful to…

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