Loving-Kindness meditation for self-criticism

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Shahar, Ben, et al. “A Wait‐List Randomized Controlled Trial of Loving‐Kindness Meditation Programme for Self‐Criticism.” Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, vol. 22, no. 4, 2015, pp. 346-356.

From the Abstract. Self-criticism is a vulnerability risk factor for a number of psychological disorders, and it predicts poor response to psychological and pharmacological treatments.

In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of a loving-kindness meditation (LKM) programme designed to increase self-compassion in a sample of self-critical individuals. Thirty-eight individuals with high scores on the self-critical perfectionism subscale of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale were randomized to an LKM condition (n=19) or a waitlist condition (n=19).

Measures of self-criticism, self-compassion and psychological distress were administered before and immediately following the intervention. participants received the intervention immediately after the waiting period. Both groups were assessed 3 months post-intervention. … A follow-up … in both groups together (n=20) showed that these gains were maintained 3 months after the…

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Here’s What 500 People Told Me about Customer Service

Blanchard LeaderChat

Customer Service Support Assistance Service Help Guide ConceptOver the last eight weeks I have done Legendary Service customer service training with more than 500 people who all want to improve both internal and external customer service in their organizations. Because I’m a big believer in the concept that no one of us is as smart as all of us, I ask participants in each class to share their ideas and strategies.

Here is the synthesis of the brilliance from amazing leaders just like you.

To rally your people to unleash the dream of Legendary Service and fuel repeat business, drive customer loyalty, and increase employee devotion, you must:

  • Listen to people’s ideas for improvement. Really listen. Spotlight situations where you have acted on their ideas. Listen with curiosity, not necessarily to find solutions.
  • Empower your team. Set clear agreements about their decision making authority. Ask them to describe circumstances where they would like the power to solve…

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Is Your Customer Service Legendary—or is it a Health Hazard?

Blanchard LeaderChat

This guest post is from Ian Beeson, managing director of Blanchard International, Australia.

Customer Satisfaction SurveyEvery interaction we have with a service provider leaves us with some sort of emotional response, from neutral and bland to deep anger and frustration at one extreme, joy and delight at the other.

We’ve all felt the stress associated with a provider whose customer experience is unresponsive and sometimes downright antagonistic—and the health effects of stress are well documented.

So are you killing your customers with stress and hostility? What are some straightforward steps you can take to nurture their long-term well-being? And why should you care?

Much has been written on the profit impact of customer service. Ken Blanchard sometimes describes profit as “the applause you get for delivering Legendary Service to your customers.” But there is a more simple, subtle, and powerful aspect to customer care. Customers will naturally move toward experiences that meet…

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Guide to Organizational Culture Change (Infographic)

Customer Experience Matters®

We regularly help companies create cultures that are more customer-centric.  So it seemed like a fun idea to create an infographic on the topic. Enjoy! You may want to see a video we created about customer-centric culture or the report, Employee-Engaging Transformation.
guide-to-organizational-culture-change

You can download (and print) this infographic in different forms:

The bottom line: The customer experience you deliver is a reflection of your culture

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Dr. Marshall Goldsmith on Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts–Becoming the Person You Want to Be

Blanchard LeaderChat

marshall-goldsmithChad Gordon interviews Dr. Marshall Goldsmith, the world’s top-rated executive coach and author of the new book, Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts–Becoming the Person You Want to Be.

Dr. Goldsmith discusses the environmental and psychological triggers that can derail us at work and in life and what we can do about it.

triggers-marshall-goldsmith-book-coverDrawing on his years of experience coaching top executives Goldsmith shares an inside look on how to achieve change in our lives.  He discusses the unique challenges top executives face and shares the number one reason people don’t act on their good intentions. He also shares six questions he recommends asking yourself everyday to stay on track and begin to find alternatives to instinctive impulse-response behavior patterns.

Goldsmith explains how planning in advance–learning to avoid negative triggers when possible–and adjusting behavior when unavoidable by recognizing we have a choice opens up new possibilities. Great advice on how to add a little…

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Health practitioners and self-compassion

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Egan, H., Mantzios, M., & Jackson, C. (2016). Health Practitioners and the Directive Towards Compassionate Healthcare in the UK: Exploring the Need to Educate Health Practitioners on How to be Self-Compassionate and Mindful Alongside Mandating Compassion Towards Patients. Health Professions Education. Online Oct 4, 2016

Concerns have been periodically raised about care that lacks compassion in health care settings. The resulting demands for an increase in consistent compassionate care for patients have frequently failed to acknowledge the potentially detrimental implications for health care professionals including compassion fatigue and a failure to care for oneself.

This communication suggests how mindfulness and self-compassion may advance means of supporting those who care for a living and extends the call for greater compassion to include people working within a contemporary health care setting in the United Kingdom. The potential benefits for both health professionals and patients is implied, and may well help to…

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Mindfulness Shines A Light on Anger

UCSD Center for Mindfulness

by Margaret Cullen and Gonzalo Brito Pons

margaretMargaret Cullen and Gonzalo Brito retrato-gonzalo-argentinaPons, co-authored “The Mindfulness-Based Emotional Balance Workbook. Join them for the Mindfulness-Based Emotional Balance (MBEB) Teacher Training Intensive, April 9-15, 2017 at EarthRise Retreat Center, Petaluma, CA. Mindfulness-Based Emotional Balance is an empirically-supported 9-week psycho-educational group intervention that teaches mindfulness meditation and emotion training.

It’s such a shame to think of how often we deride ourselves, and each other, for being “emotional.” It’s like jumping on someone for breathing. Emotion is a process that is a vital part of being alive. As the pioneering psychologist of emotions Paul Ekman has said, emotion is a kind of rapid, automatic appraisal of what’s going on. It’s influenced by our evolutionary past as well as our personal past, such that when “we sense that something important to our welfare is occurring…a set of physiological changes and emotional behaviors begins to deal…

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