Dr. Marshall Goldsmith on Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts–Becoming the Person You Want to Be

Blanchard LeaderChat

marshall-goldsmithChad Gordon interviews Dr. Marshall Goldsmith, the world’s top-rated executive coach and author of the new book, Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts–Becoming the Person You Want to Be.

Dr. Goldsmith discusses the environmental and psychological triggers that can derail us at work and in life and what we can do about it.

triggers-marshall-goldsmith-book-coverDrawing on his years of experience coaching top executives Goldsmith shares an inside look on how to achieve change in our lives.  He discusses the unique challenges top executives face and shares the number one reason people don’t act on their good intentions. He also shares six questions he recommends asking yourself everyday to stay on track and begin to find alternatives to instinctive impulse-response behavior patterns.

Goldsmith explains how planning in advance–learning to avoid negative triggers when possible–and adjusting behavior when unavoidable by recognizing we have a choice opens up new possibilities. Great advice on how to add a little…

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Health practitioners and self-compassion

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Egan, H., Mantzios, M., & Jackson, C. (2016). Health Practitioners and the Directive Towards Compassionate Healthcare in the UK: Exploring the Need to Educate Health Practitioners on How to be Self-Compassionate and Mindful Alongside Mandating Compassion Towards Patients. Health Professions Education. Online Oct 4, 2016

Concerns have been periodically raised about care that lacks compassion in health care settings. The resulting demands for an increase in consistent compassionate care for patients have frequently failed to acknowledge the potentially detrimental implications for health care professionals including compassion fatigue and a failure to care for oneself.

This communication suggests how mindfulness and self-compassion may advance means of supporting those who care for a living and extends the call for greater compassion to include people working within a contemporary health care setting in the United Kingdom. The potential benefits for both health professionals and patients is implied, and may well help to…

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Mindfulness Shines A Light on Anger

UCSD Center for Mindfulness

by Margaret Cullen and Gonzalo Brito Pons

margaretMargaret Cullen and Gonzalo Brito retrato-gonzalo-argentinaPons, co-authored “The Mindfulness-Based Emotional Balance Workbook. Join them for the Mindfulness-Based Emotional Balance (MBEB) Teacher Training Intensive, April 9-15, 2017 at EarthRise Retreat Center, Petaluma, CA. Mindfulness-Based Emotional Balance is an empirically-supported 9-week psycho-educational group intervention that teaches mindfulness meditation and emotion training.

It’s such a shame to think of how often we deride ourselves, and each other, for being “emotional.” It’s like jumping on someone for breathing. Emotion is a process that is a vital part of being alive. As the pioneering psychologist of emotions Paul Ekman has said, emotion is a kind of rapid, automatic appraisal of what’s going on. It’s influenced by our evolutionary past as well as our personal past, such that when “we sense that something important to our welfare is occurring…a set of physiological changes and emotional behaviors begins to deal…

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“People are naturally lazy” and Other Myths about Employee Engagement

Blanchard LeaderChat

When you look at all of the stats pointing to the low levels of employee engagement in the US and around the world, you might start to believe that people are naturally lazy and disengaged—or that people wouldn’t work if they didn’t have to.

But that’s not true. In fact, that kind of misinterpretation of the research can lead to assumptions that actually perpetuate disengagement, such as the concept of organizations needing to use incentives, rewards, promotions, praising, perks, status building, pay raises, games, competition, or prizes to get anything accomplished.

Knowing the truth behind the nature of human motivation will not only help you reframe the research and rethink your basic beliefs, it will also allow you to embrace new practices that result in employee engagement and work passion. Let me explain.

People’s Basic Nature is to Thrive

In the 2014 movie Gravity, Sandra Bullock’s character goes into…

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38 Emotions You’ve Felt, But Couldn’t Explain


There are many feelings we can experience without an actual word that describes the sensation.
These are like poems. If you get up and read them as such, giving proper weight and pause to each phrase, they are really well done. Especially loved Nighthawk and the one about the lighthouse and death. So true!

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Three Ideas to Re-Humanize Patient Experience

Customer Experience Matters®

I was recently interviewed for an article that discusses a post where Fox News journalist John Stossel describes his experience as a lung cancer patient at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

First of all, I hope that Stossel’s treatment is successful. And although I don’t fully agree with his analysis of the industry, I do agree with his observation “…I have to say, the hospital’s customer service stinks.” Yes, there is a problem with patient experience.

I’m reminded of this picture from a post that I wrote in 2009, which comes from Cleveland Clinic’s 2008 Annual Report.


With all of the focus on costs and liabilities, the medical system has forgotten about the soul of the patient. It’s become dehumanized.

The wellbeing of a patient often takes a back seat to rigid processes and procedures, and there’s little understanding of how to help patients make increasingly important financial/medical trade-offs. It’s not that doctors…

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Managers’ spirituality, mindfulness, and ethical behaviour

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

McGhee, P., & Grant, P. (2015). The influence of managers’ spiritual mindfulness on ethical behaviour in organisations. Journal of Spirituality, Leadership and Management, 8 (1), 12-33.Full text. http://dx.doi.org/10.15183/slm2015.08.1113

Abstract. Recently, there have been several corporate scandals both in New Zealand and overseas involving unethical management behaviour that caused significant harm to a range of stakeholders. The literature on spirituality and mindfulness posits that each could enhance ethical praxis and management conduct if they were encouraged in organisations. To date, minimal work has been completed bringing these related constructs together and demonstrating how and why they might influence ethical decision-making and behaviour positively. This paper attempts such a combination.

As part of a larger study, 14 managers from a variety of organisations were interviewed to determine how their spirituality influenced their ethical behaviour in the workplace. Using stories of real-life critical incidents and thematic analysis, this research found that…

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