Examining 10 Emotions, 8 Interactions, and Resulting Loyalty

Customer Experience Matters®

Any regular reader of this blog likely knows that emotion is a key topic for Temkin Group. We labelled 2016 as The Year of Emotion and operationalizing emotion is one of our 2017 CX trends.

As part of our push to drive more detailed discussions about emotion, we examined the emotions that consumers feel after specific interactions. It turns out that different interactions lead to a variety of emotions which have differing loyalty effects.

The chart below shows 10 emotions that 10,000 consumers selected to describe how they felt after completing eight interactions.

As you can see above:

  • Most interactions lead to positive emotions, as the four most prevalent emotions on our list are Happy, Excited, Relieved, and Confident.
  • Happy and Excited are the most common emotions.
  • Purchasing a new pair of shoes leads to the most frequent emotion, Happy.
  • Researching a health insurance plan doesn’t create any consistent emotional response, as…

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Mindfulness at work: being while doing

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Lyddy, Christopher, and Darren J. Good. “Being While Doing: An Inductive Model of Mindfulness at Work.” Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 7, 2017, pp. 1-18. Full text.

Abstract. Mindfulness at work has drawn growing interest as empirical evidence increasingly supports its positive workplace impacts. Yet theory also suggests that mindfulness is a cognitive mode of “Being” that may be incompatible with the cognitive mode of “Doing” that undergirds workplace functioning. Therefore, mindfulness at work has been theorized as “being while doing,” but little is known regarding how people experience these two modes in combination, nor the influences or outcomes of this interaction.

Drawing on a sample of 39 semi-structured interviews, this study explores how professionals experience being mindful at work. The relationship between Being and Doing modes demonstrated changing compatibility across individuals and experience, with two basic types of experiences and three types of transitions. We labeled experiences when informants were…

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Mindfulness Building Resilience and Improving Care in Modern Medicine

UCSD Center for Mindfulness

We have two lives, and the second begins when we realize we only have one.  – Confucius

By Michael Krasner, MD, FACP

mindfulpracticeAfter 6 years of sharing Mindful Practice in intensive retreat trainings with over 400 physicians, medical educators and other health professionals from all over the globe, Ron Epstein and I began to ask ourselves- why wait for our colleagues to come to us? If the need for building resilience among our colleagues is pressing, and the tools for helping improve quality of care, quality of caring, and our own well-being are effective, relevant and accessible, why delay offering this training to more professionals? So we have decided to take Mindful Practice trainings into regional settings, offering it in a new, multi-modal, and engaging way. We already have two trainings scheduled for San Diego and Boston this winter. We will soon announce a workshop next fall in the Pacific…

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Put Culture Change On Your 2017 CX Agenda. Here’s How.

Customer Experience Matters®

If you’re thinking about improving your organization’s customer experience next year (and why wouldn’t you be?!?), then I hope you are also thinking about some changes in your organization’s culture. As I’ve said many, many times, your customer experience is a reflection of your culture and operating processes. It’s your culture that will sustain any improvements that you make in customer experience.

As I’m sure you know, culture change isn’t easy. People are naturally averse to change. As John Kenneth Galbraith so aptly stated, “Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof.”

1612_employeereactiontochange

Any chance of a successful, purposeful change in your culture needs to focus on the thoughts, beliefs, and actions of individual employees. That’s the foundation of a concept that Temkin Group introduced called Employee-Engaging Transformation (EET). EET is based on five practices: Vision…

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Want Loyal Customers? Start Talking About Their Emotions!

Customer Experience Matters®

Did you know that customers who feel adoring after an experience are more than 11 times as likely to buy more from a company than customers who feel angry? And customers who feel appreciative are more than 5 times as likely to trust a company than those who feel agitated?

That’s because how customers feel about an interaction has a significant impact on their loyalty to a company. So let’s talk about emotions.

Despite the importance of customer emotions, they are all too often neglected (or outright ignored) inside of companies. As a result of this negligence, consumers give their providers very low emotion scores in our Temkin Experience Ratings.

It’s time to start talking about emotions. To help spur this dialogue, we introduced a new vocabulary that we call the Five A’s of an Emotional Response.

1612_5asofemotionalresponse

Every time a customer interacts with you, they feel one of…

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Loving-Kindness meditation for self-criticism

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Shahar, Ben, et al. “A Wait‐List Randomized Controlled Trial of Loving‐Kindness Meditation Programme for Self‐Criticism.” Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, vol. 22, no. 4, 2015, pp. 346-356.

From the Abstract. Self-criticism is a vulnerability risk factor for a number of psychological disorders, and it predicts poor response to psychological and pharmacological treatments.

In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of a loving-kindness meditation (LKM) programme designed to increase self-compassion in a sample of self-critical individuals. Thirty-eight individuals with high scores on the self-critical perfectionism subscale of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale were randomized to an LKM condition (n=19) or a waitlist condition (n=19).

Measures of self-criticism, self-compassion and psychological distress were administered before and immediately following the intervention. participants received the intervention immediately after the waiting period. Both groups were assessed 3 months post-intervention. … A follow-up … in both groups together (n=20) showed that these gains were maintained 3 months after the…

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Here’s What 500 People Told Me about Customer Service

Blanchard LeaderChat

Customer Service Support Assistance Service Help Guide ConceptOver the last eight weeks I have done Legendary Service customer service training with more than 500 people who all want to improve both internal and external customer service in their organizations. Because I’m a big believer in the concept that no one of us is as smart as all of us, I ask participants in each class to share their ideas and strategies.

Here is the synthesis of the brilliance from amazing leaders just like you.

To rally your people to unleash the dream of Legendary Service and fuel repeat business, drive customer loyalty, and increase employee devotion, you must:

  • Listen to people’s ideas for improvement. Really listen. Spotlight situations where you have acted on their ideas. Listen with curiosity, not necessarily to find solutions.
  • Empower your team. Set clear agreements about their decision making authority. Ask them to describe circumstances where they would like the power to solve…

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