Examining 10 Emotions, 8 Interactions, and Resulting Loyalty

Customer Experience Matters®

Any regular reader of this blog likely knows that emotion is a key topic for Temkin Group. We labelled 2016 as The Year of Emotion and operationalizing emotion is one of our 2017 CX trends.

As part of our push to drive more detailed discussions about emotion, we examined the emotions that consumers feel after specific interactions. It turns out that different interactions lead to a variety of emotions which have differing loyalty effects.

The chart below shows 10 emotions that 10,000 consumers selected to describe how they felt after completing eight interactions.

As you can see above:

  • Most interactions lead to positive emotions, as the four most prevalent emotions on our list are Happy, Excited, Relieved, and Confident.
  • Happy and Excited are the most common emotions.
  • Purchasing a new pair of shoes leads to the most frequent emotion, Happy.
  • Researching a health insurance plan doesn’t create any consistent emotional response, as…

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Capitalizing on the Voice of the Customer (Infographic)

Customer Experience Matters®

Voice of the customer programs are a cornerstone for most customer experience efforts. That’s why Temkin Group put together this infographic with insights from our research.

Here’s a poster version and you can see the full infographic below. I hope you enjoy it.

StateOfVoC_Infographic_TemkinGroup2

Here are links to download versions of the infographic:

Here are links to the research referenced in the infographic:

The bottom line: Make sure to capitalize on the voice of your customers.

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Lesson From Dana-Farber: Treat The Whole Person

Customer Experience Matters®

As part of yesterday’s Customer Experience Day celebration, I attended a CXPA local networking event at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) in Boston. The session kicked off with a panel from the DFCI discussing patient experience.

I’m a big fan of DFCI and have enormous respect for the great work that it does in battling cancer. The panel, which included a cancer survivor turned volunteer, was fantastic. I was inspired by the commitment and compassion they displayed.

One of the points that came up was DFCI’s commitment to treat the whole person. This explains why it provides things such as hand massages during chemotherapy treatment. DFCI doesn’t just treat the disease, it treats the whole person.

I love the concept of the whole person. It’s not just applicable to DFCI or other health care providers, but to every organization. It’s a powerful concept for anyone who cares about customer experience. Here’s how I…

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The Untapped Value of Employee Engagement (Infographic)

Customer Experience Matters®

We created this infographic called “The Untapped Value of Employee Engagement” with some of our employee engagement research.

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If you like the infographic, then here are some other download formats that are made for prinintg:

Also, check out our Employee Engagement Resource Page.

The bottom line: Companies need to focus more on employee engagement

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People-Centric Experience Design Principle #3: Design for Memories

Customer Experience Matters®

I recently introduced a concept for enlisting the support of employees that uncovers and fulfills the needs of customers that we call People-Centric Experience Design (PCxD), defined as:

Fostering an environment that creates positive, memorable human encounters

PCxD

Principle #3: Design for Memories

When it comes to loyalty, customer experience isn’t the driving factor. That’s right, customer experience is not the key driver. What is important? Memories. People make decisions based on how they remember experiences, not on how they actually experienced them. This distinction is important because people don’t remember experiences the way they actually occur. Rather, people construct memories as stories in their mind based on the fragments of their actual experiences. An improved understanding of how people truly remember things helps you focus on designing the most important movements better. When examining the emotional reactions of people throughout an experience, it becomes apparent that five elements disproportionately drive…

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10 Behaviors That Distinguish Purposeful Leaders

Customer Experience Matters®

To better understand the behaviors that are most indicative of successful leaders, we asked 5,334 U.S. consumers who are currently employed to answer some questions about their direct managers. We asked them to rate the success of their manager as a leader within the organization and to describe how often those managers demonstrate 41 leadership behaviors that we tested (click to download full list of behaviors (.pdf)).

We compared the frequency with which very successful leaders demonstrated the behaviors with the frequency demonstrated by other managers. The behaviors with the largest gaps represent the most distinguishing characteristics of purposeful leaders. It turns out that these very successful leaders are much more likely to:

  1. Motivate other people to deliver their best work
  2. Help people understand complex situations by describing things in simple terms
  3. Help people make decisions by presenting clear options
  4. Motivate other people to work together to achieve a common…

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Customer Experience Leadership Requires Engaged Employees

Customer Experience Matters®

One of the Six Laws of Customer Experience is “Unengaged employees don’t create engaged customers.” That’s why Employee Engagement is one of Temkin Group’s four customer experience core competencies. To help make this point very clear, I tapped into the data from our upcoming report, Employee Engagement Benchmark Study, 2014 (see last year’s report).

As you can see in the following chart with data from more than 5,000 full time employees in the U.S., customer experience leaders have significantly more engaged employees than do customer experience laggards. When compared with companies that have CX worse than their competitors, companies with significantly better CX have 3.5 times as many highly engaged employees and less than 1/4 as many disengaged employees.

1402_CXvsEEThe bottom line: To sustain great CX, you must have engaged employees.

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