Patient Engagement for Free?

Engaging The Patient

Contributor: Hailey Merk – Client Services Intern, Emmi Solutions

Hailey Merk Hailey Merk

If there is one word in the entire English dictionary that my father tells me doesn’t really exist, it’s the word ‘free’. There always seems to be a catch, right? Yet, hospitals around the country have groups of highly motivated and caring people who want to make a difference in healthcare and the patient experience for zero dollar signs in return. This jumps out at me like a 3D pop up advertisement on my computer flashing, “ROI, you won, pick me!”

A study from the Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly Journal looked at the cost benefits of volunteer programs and found an average of $6.84 in value from volunteers for every dollar spent—a return on investment of 684%.If hospitals can invest enough time to interview, train and engage a class of volunteers, while concocting new tasks that will transition…

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The DOs & DON’Ts of Curious Listening: Tell Me More

Masterpiece Leader Blog

If you are a leader, you are in the relationship business. Whether a colleague, client, vendor, front-line worker, or networking connection, you interact with people every day. If, in your interactions, you are mindful about making a human connection, you will establish the foundation for a positive, beneficial relationship. A key to making that connection is listening—and listening takes practice.

Curious Listening

Edgar Schein refers to Humble Inquiry as asking questions from an attitude of genuine curiosity and interest about the other person. In this post, we will focus on the listening part of Humble Inquiry. We call it “curious listening.” This type of listening is more than just hearing or being attentive and it is not the kind of listening where you expect to gain knowledge. It is a higher level of listening that Otto Scharmer describes as “seeing from our deepest source” and what Daniel Goleman refers to as…

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Leader rounding: Up close and personal on the frontlines of care

Virginia Mason Medical Center Blog

 “Genba rounds take conversations out of a conference room and move it to that central area of the practice. As a leader, you are visible there making it clear that we don’t want to merely sit in a conference room and look at a bunch of reports of what’s already happened.”
— Shelly Fagerlund

One of the iconic images of the Toyota Production System involves leaders being physically present on the genba – the shop floor. When Virginia Mason teams make their annual pilgrimage to Japan to study the Toyota method (they have done so for 12 consecutive years), they are constantly reminded that leaders are most effective when present on the front lines. It is where the work happens. It is where coaching and teaching happens. It is where leadership happens.

Leader rounding at Virginia Mason draws from the Toyota tradition. Many leaders throughout the organization at a variety…

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L.E.A.D with Emotional Intelligence

Lead to Serve

Emotional-Intelligence1

Emotions and leadership are not separate ideas.  Positive leaders can uplift and energize teams to a new level of performance. Some people call emotions “soft” and un-business like. We all know the cliché that leaders are not supposed to show emotions at work and the debate goes on and on….

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Everything You Need to Know About Giving Negative Feedback