Examining 10 Emotions, 8 Interactions, and Resulting Loyalty

Customer Experience Matters®

Any regular reader of this blog likely knows that emotion is a key topic for Temkin Group. We labelled 2016 as The Year of Emotion and operationalizing emotion is one of our 2017 CX trends.

As part of our push to drive more detailed discussions about emotion, we examined the emotions that consumers feel after specific interactions. It turns out that different interactions lead to a variety of emotions which have differing loyalty effects.

The chart below shows 10 emotions that 10,000 consumers selected to describe how they felt after completing eight interactions.

As you can see above:

  • Most interactions lead to positive emotions, as the four most prevalent emotions on our list are Happy, Excited, Relieved, and Confident.
  • Happy and Excited are the most common emotions.
  • Purchasing a new pair of shoes leads to the most frequent emotion, Happy.
  • Researching a health insurance plan doesn’t create any consistent emotional response, as…

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Mindfulness at work: being while doing

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Lyddy, Christopher, and Darren J. Good. “Being While Doing: An Inductive Model of Mindfulness at Work.” Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 7, 2017, pp. 1-18. Full text.

Abstract. Mindfulness at work has drawn growing interest as empirical evidence increasingly supports its positive workplace impacts. Yet theory also suggests that mindfulness is a cognitive mode of “Being” that may be incompatible with the cognitive mode of “Doing” that undergirds workplace functioning. Therefore, mindfulness at work has been theorized as “being while doing,” but little is known regarding how people experience these two modes in combination, nor the influences or outcomes of this interaction.

Drawing on a sample of 39 semi-structured interviews, this study explores how professionals experience being mindful at work. The relationship between Being and Doing modes demonstrated changing compatibility across individuals and experience, with two basic types of experiences and three types of transitions. We labeled experiences when informants were…

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