Mindfulness Building Resilience and Improving Care in Modern Medicine

UCSD Center for Mindfulness

We have two lives, and the second begins when we realize we only have one.  – Confucius

By Michael Krasner, MD, FACP

mindfulpracticeAfter 6 years of sharing Mindful Practice in intensive retreat trainings with over 400 physicians, medical educators and other health professionals from all over the globe, Ron Epstein and I began to ask ourselves- why wait for our colleagues to come to us? If the need for building resilience among our colleagues is pressing, and the tools for helping improve quality of care, quality of caring, and our own well-being are effective, relevant and accessible, why delay offering this training to more professionals? So we have decided to take Mindful Practice trainings into regional settings, offering it in a new, multi-modal, and engaging way. We already have two trainings scheduled for San Diego and Boston this winter. We will soon announce a workshop next fall in the Pacific…

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Health practitioners and self-compassion

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Egan, H., Mantzios, M., & Jackson, C. (2016). Health Practitioners and the Directive Towards Compassionate Healthcare in the UK: Exploring the Need to Educate Health Practitioners on How to be Self-Compassionate and Mindful Alongside Mandating Compassion Towards Patients. Health Professions Education. Online Oct 4, 2016

Concerns have been periodically raised about care that lacks compassion in health care settings. The resulting demands for an increase in consistent compassionate care for patients have frequently failed to acknowledge the potentially detrimental implications for health care professionals including compassion fatigue and a failure to care for oneself.

This communication suggests how mindfulness and self-compassion may advance means of supporting those who care for a living and extends the call for greater compassion to include people working within a contemporary health care setting in the United Kingdom. The potential benefits for both health professionals and patients is implied, and may well help to…

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Creating a culture of mindfulness in medicine

Mindfulness: theories & benefits

Luchterhand, C., et al. (2015). Creating a Culture of Mindfulness in Medicine. Health Innovations (Wisconsin Medical Journal), 114(3), 105-109. Full text.

Background: Well-documented challenges faced by primary care clinicians have brought growing awareness to the issues of physician wellness and burnout and the potential subsequent impact on patients. Research has identified mindfulness as a tool to increase clinician well-being and enhance clinician characteristics associated with a more patient-centered orientation to clinical care.

Objective: The overall goal of our intervention was to promote the cultivation of mindful awareness throughout our health system, creating a culture of mindfulness in medicine
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Methods: We developed a systems-level strategy to promote health and resilience for clinicians and patients by preparing a group of clinician leaders to serve as catalysts to practice and teach mindfulness. The strategy involved 3 steps: (1) select 5 primary care leaders to help foster mindfulness within both…

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Reblog: The Problem With Patient Experience

This is one of (if not) the best article I’ve read on the key drivers of patient experience! Clear and simple!

Experience Innovation Network

This blog post originally appeared on the PRC Custom Research blog on April 30, 2015. Co-authored by William Maples, M.D., oncologist, passionate and compassionate champion for experience improvement, founding member and continuing contributor to the Experience Innovation Network, we thought it was too good not to share. Reblogged with permission.

By William Maples, MD, Executive Director for The Institute for Healthcare Excellence and Candace A. Quinn, COO, Professional Research Consultants, Inc.

As a result of an article that we saw recently in The Atlantic that attempted to describe the quest for creating an excellent patient experience as one that has nurses and caregivers pursuing some holy grail of happiness, good food, and smiles, we reflected on the importance and impact of patient experience on the overall care and eventual health of each and every patient, and, we have reaffirmed our conviction that our industry must first develop an understanding of…

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Engaging Patients in Hourly Rounding: Improving the Patient and the Caregiver Experience

Engaging The Patient

Contributors: Geri Lynn Baumblatt – Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi Solutions; Greg Berney – Senior Manager of Patient Experience, Cone Health (Originally published for the Association of Patient Experience)

Greg Berney Greg Berney

Several months ago, a Patient Experience Manager at Cone Health was rounding with a nurse on a med/surg department. We’ll call him “James.” As James discussed different patient experience improvement tactics, he verbalized a concern with hourly rounding logs. “Each time I put my initials on that log I feel frustration with leadership because it feels like they don’t trust me.” Leaders, in turn, felt frustrated because the logs were their only way of ensuring hourly rounding was happening.

While James identified a lack of trust as his main frustration, this also articulates a greater challenge in improving the Patient Experience: ensuring our goals and how we motivate caregivers to meet those goals match. As James would tell you…

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What Behavioral Economics Can Teach Us About the Patient Experience

Engaging The Patient

Contributor: Courtney Hummel – Senior Client Services Specialist, Emmi Solutions

Courtney Hummel Courtney Hummel

In his TEDtalk, “The Riddle of Experience vs. Memory”, behavioral economist Daniel Kahneman tells a short story about a man listening to a symphony. The man experiences such joy throughout the entire performance , intensely feeling and relating to the music. As the recording meandered to its finale, the music suddenly stopped, replaced by a horrible screeching sound. This ruined the entire symphony, the man solemnly remembered. But, had it? He experienced 20 minutes of glorious music, jarred by a few seconds of madness. But those 20 minutes were now irrelevant; the experience was ruined, replaced with a marred memory.

One key takeaway from this scenario is the human memory is significantly and consistently biased. We must understand that a memory is merely the end result of an experience and the processing of that experience. It’s helpful to…

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At your service: Bringing hospitality to hospitals leads to happier patients

BringMeTheNews.com

While you won’t get a mint on your pillow at your next hospital stay, you may notice a better overall experience. Hospitals are taking a cue from the hospitality industry to boost patient satisfaction with a newly created job: chief experience officer.

Think of a chief experience officer (CXO) as a high-level hospital concierge who ensures that a patient’s hospital stay is as comfortable and pleasant as possible. A CXO champions compassionate care, focusing on open communication with patients and “making sure staff are attentive to their needs, whether that’s more face time with nurses or quieter hallways so they can sleep,” reports The Washington Post.

Happy patients, prosperous hospitals

The shift to improve customer service isn’t entirely due to the kindness of medical executives; it benefits hospitals as well. Patient satisfaction scores — tallied by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey — have…

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