Focus On Employee Engagement, Not Employee Experience

Customer Experience Matters®

We are finally seeing a movement by the general business world to seriously focus on the role and value of employees, which is why “Embracing Employee Engagement” is one of our 2017 CX Trends. Temkin Group has viewed employee engagement as a critical foundation for customer experience since our inception. It’s one of our Four CX Core Competencies.

While the trend is great, there’s still a long way to go. I’d love to see many more human resources organizations recognize that employee engagement is one of their strategic objectives (see my post, HR Execs: Wake Up To Employee Engagement!).

As this area has gained attention, there’s been a troubling misunderstanding creeping up in the dialogue. People are confuscating Employee Engagement with Employee Experience. They are not the same.

It’s important to understand the distinction, because only one of them is the foundation to success. So let’s look at each…

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Building Organizational Empathy: Perceive-Reflect-Adjust

In his blog, “Building Organizational Empathy: Perceive-Reflect-Adjust,” Bruce Temkin writes about a critical differentiating factor, namely, empathy — one’s ability to feel, understand and appreciate the experience of another. Because of the acute vulnerability associated with the majority of patient conditions and situations in healthcare, emotional intelligence of a hospital’s culture and its caregivers to perceive, reflect on and adjust to the felt-experiences of patients and their family members is essential. Why? Maya Angelou once wrote, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Creating a signature experience for our patients and their families at its most fundamental and basic level involves understanding how a patient and/or family member feels, examining our actions and how they affect the other and quickly and effectively making the necessary changes so as to improve how the patient/family member feels.

Customer Experience Matters®

Most people have an innate ability to be empathetic, but organizations tend to dampen this natural instinct. While a typical customer interaction cuts across many functional groups (a single purchase, for instance, may include contact with decisions by product management, sales, marketing, accounts payable, and legal organizations), companies push employees to stay focused on their functional areas. This myopic view is often reinforced by incentives focused on narrow domains, which creates a perceived chasm between customer empathy and employee success.

After examining much of the academic, medical, and business research on the topic of empathy, we developed a simple model for enhancing empathy that we call Perceive-Reflect-Adjust:

  • Perceive: Understand how someone else feels
  • Reflect: Examine how your actions affect those feelings
  • Adjust: Make changes to improve how someone else feels

P-R-A is a helpful model to follow for triggering individual empathy, but how can organizations apply…

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