Mindfulness Building Resilience and Improving Care in Modern Medicine

UCSD Center for Mindfulness

We have two lives, and the second begins when we realize we only have one.  – Confucius

By Michael Krasner, MD, FACP

mindfulpracticeAfter 6 years of sharing Mindful Practice in intensive retreat trainings with over 400 physicians, medical educators and other health professionals from all over the globe, Ron Epstein and I began to ask ourselves- why wait for our colleagues to come to us? If the need for building resilience among our colleagues is pressing, and the tools for helping improve quality of care, quality of caring, and our own well-being are effective, relevant and accessible, why delay offering this training to more professionals? So we have decided to take Mindful Practice trainings into regional settings, offering it in a new, multi-modal, and engaging way. We already have two trainings scheduled for San Diego and Boston this winter. We will soon announce a workshop next fall in the Pacific…

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Engaging Patients in Hourly Rounding: Improving the Patient and the Caregiver Experience

Engaging The Patient

Contributors: Geri Lynn Baumblatt – Executive Director of Patient Engagement, Emmi Solutions; Greg Berney – Senior Manager of Patient Experience, Cone Health (Originally published for the Association of Patient Experience)

Greg Berney Greg Berney

Several months ago, a Patient Experience Manager at Cone Health was rounding with a nurse on a med/surg department. We’ll call him “James.” As James discussed different patient experience improvement tactics, he verbalized a concern with hourly rounding logs. “Each time I put my initials on that log I feel frustration with leadership because it feels like they don’t trust me.” Leaders, in turn, felt frustrated because the logs were their only way of ensuring hourly rounding was happening.

While James identified a lack of trust as his main frustration, this also articulates a greater challenge in improving the Patient Experience: ensuring our goals and how we motivate caregivers to meet those goals match. As James would tell you…

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Enhances nurses’ coping with stress, burnout, and anxiety

Research on Meditation & Mindfulness

Smith, S. A. (2014). Mindfulness‐Based Stress Reduction: An Intervention to Enhance the Effectiveness of Nurses’ Coping With Work‐Related Stress. International Journal of Nursing Knowledge. P ublished online before inclusion in an issue.

Abstract: This critical literature review explored the current state of the science regarding mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) as a potential intervention to improve the ability of nurses to effectively cope with stress.

Empirical evidence regarding utilizing MBSR with nurses and other healthcare professionals suggests several positive benefits including decreased stress, burnout, and anxiety; and increased empathy, focus, and mood.

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